DEADPOOL 2 (2018)

May 16, 2018

 Greetings again from the darkness. We couldn’t help but ask “why?” when the sequel was announced, even though we knew the answer was money. There was little hope in improving on the first DEADPOOL (2016), and since that film’s director, Tim Miller, was tied up with upcoming projects for X-Men and Terminator, there was understandable concern that changing the recipe could result in huge disappointment. While it may not be an improvement on the first, only those with unrealistic expectations are likely to be disappointed … the rest of us will spend most of two hours laughing and enjoying the spectacle.

Director David Leitch exploded onto the scene with last year’s surprise action hit ATOMIC BLONDE, and his stuntman experience is once again on display with even more frenzied action and fight sequences this time out. As you might expect, there is no easing into the comedy routine here. The Opening Credits are laugh out loud funny and the only thing better may be the closing credits sequence, which is an instant classic.

No punchlines will be spoiled here, and it’s an obvious statement, but clearly no topic or subject, or at least very few, are off-limits. Targets of barbs include LinkedIn, YENTL, FROZEN, Fox & Friends, and well, the list goes on and on. You’ll likely miss 20 percent of the dialogue whilst laughing. The “Merc with a Mouth” (Ryan Reynolds) breaks the 4th wall in atypical fashion – blurring the line through dialogue incorporated into the story. The self-awareness is comical in its own right.

Some familiar faces are back. Wade’s main squeeze Vanessa (Marina Baccarin) kicks off the “kids” discussion (Yikes!) and the couple seems to have settled into cohabitant bliss – never a good sign in a superhero movie. TJ Miller (despite his recent headlines) is back running Sister Margaret’s Bar, though his minimal presence is noted. Also back is Colossus (voiced by Stefan Kapicic), and his expanded role finds him turning Deadpool into an X-Men trainee at Professor Xavier’s School for the gifted. This occurs after tragedy strikes and we are introduced to some new players. Julian Dennison (so good in HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE) plays FireFist, and of course, the arrival of Cable (Josh Brolin) shows us what happens when a time-travelling Terminator type is out for revenge.

Snarking, mocking and irreverence remain in full force throughout, but if you happen to pay attention to the story, you’ll notice a (not-so) subtle transition taking place. The renegade superhero shifts from loner to team player, and even picks up some life lessons along the way – mostly related to loss and collaboration. Deadpool even forms his own team called X-Force, and one of the more interesting members is Domino (Zazie Beetz), whose superpower is luck (yep).  We do get a surprise cameo, and there’s even a shot of Deadpool with no pants … and it’s markedly unsexy. The music selections are inspired, however, if you are unsure whether this movie is for you … it probably isn’t.

watch the trailer:

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DEADPOOL (2016)

February 12, 2016

deadpool Greetings again from the darkness. Superhero movies have been dominating the box office for the better part of two decades, and most tend to lean towards moody and intense … though Iron-Man and The Avengers have certainly enjoyed adding searing one-liners to the mix. As for ratings, superheroes have steadfastly claimed PG-13 as the perfect blend of massive action, massive muscles and massive audiences. So it’s a little surprising to find a movie about a relatively unknown superhero, that’s the first feature from director Tim Miller (previously a visual effects guru), crashing through the R-rated barrier in no-holds-barred fashion. It’s startling and refreshing to see a new take on what had become just a bit too familiar.

This is a movie for which you will want to actually read the opening credits and stay for the post credit scene (a 2-parter). Additionally, you will want to make sure you keep not only little kids away (remember the hard R-rating), but also any grown-ups who are offended by harsh language (on the Tarantino scale), ultra-violence (on the Kill Bill scale) or any combination of sex, sex talk or sex jokes (all at an entirely new level). To label this movie as crass or profane is like calling Chewbacca somewhat fuzzy. And while it pushes the raunch-o-meter, it’s also blazingly funny at times (especially for a cancer movie).

The previously mentioned opening credits refer to the writers as “the real heroes here”, and while the plot is pretty textbook superhero stuff, it’s the barrage of one-liners and sight gags at which those writers so excel. They even make sure those unfamiliar with the Wade Wilson backstory understand that he is a former special forces operative turned mercenary for the average Joe’s and Jane’s. In no time, it’s drilled into our heads that he is also a wiseacre, wisenheimer, wise-ass, wisecracker and any other adjective that means funny but not wise.

Ryan Reynolds stars as Wade Wilson/Deadpool and leaves no doubt that he has finally found the role that fits him as well as his red suit. If you are convulsing as you flashback to Mr. Reynolds as Green Lantern (2011), take solace in the fact that this movie fires a couple of deadly shots at that oh-so-disappointing effort. His girlfriend Vanessa is played by Morena Baccarin (“Homeland”), and his best buddy/bartender is played by TJ Miller (“Silicon Valley”). Since Reynolds had a brief appearance as Deadpool in X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009), there are numerous nods to that franchise, including two key roles here for Colossus (Stefan Kapicic) and Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand). The target of Deadpool’s revenge comes in the form of Ed Skrein (The Transporter Refueled) as Ajax and Gina Carano as Angel Dust … accompanied by her theme song “Angel of the Morning” (unfortunately it’s the Juice Newton version, and not the more powerful Merrillee Rush and the Turnabouts version). Lastly, it’s pure joy to see Leslie Uggams cast in a spunky supporting role, and Stan Lee appears in what might be his most unique cameo yet.

As for music, the range is Neil Sedaka to DMX – yep, you’re unlikely to find a more diverse soundtrack. Your kid may have a Captain America figurine on their bookshelf, but the R-rating for this one is solidified in the first 10 minutes, and is relentlessly reinforced until the movie ends – this means don’t bring your kids! We can only imagine how much fun those old enough to watch are going to have, and brace yourself for an onslaught of Deadpool comebacks over the next few weeks … only hopefully not in church, at the office, in front of grandma, etc …

watch the trailer:

 

 


WOMAN IN GOLD (2015)

March 31, 2015

woman in gold Greetings again from the darkness. The responsibility of the filmmaker when the project is “based on a true story” is elevated when the story has significant historical relevance and blends such elements as art, identity, justice and international law. Add to those the quest of a remarkable woman whose family was ripped apart by Nazi insurgents, and more than a history lesson, it becomes a poignant personal story.

Helen Mirren portrays Maria Altmann, the woman who emigrated to the United States by fleeing her Austrian homeland during World War II, and leaving behind her beloved family and all possessions. After the death of her sister, Ms. Altmann becomes aware of the family artwork stolen by the Nazi’s during the invasion. This is not just any artwork, but multiple pieces from famed Austrian artist Gustav Klimt … including “Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer”. See, Adele was Maria’s aunt, and the stunning piece (with gold leaf accents) has become “the Mona Lisa of Austria”, while hanging for decades in the state gallery.

The story revolves around Maria’s partnering with family friend and upstart attorney Randol Schoenberg (Ryan Reynolds) to take on the nation of Austria and reclaim the (extremely valuable) artwork that was seized illegally so many years ago. They are aided in their mission by an Austrian journalist (played by Daniel Bruhl) who is fighting his own demons. The seven-plus year legal saga is condensed for the big screen and we follow Maria and Randol as they meet with the Austrian art reclamation committee, a federal judge (played by the director’s wife Elizabeth McGovern), the U.S. Supreme Court (Jonathan Pryce as Chief Justice), and finally a mediation committee back in Austria. But this is not really a courtroom drama … it’s a personal quest for justice and search for identity. What role does family roots and history play in determining who we are today? It’s the age old question of past vs. present, only this is seen through the eyes of a woman who has survived what most of us can only imagine.

Director Simon Curtis (My Week with Marilyn) uses startling flashbacks (with Tatiana Maslany as the younger Maria) to provide glimpses of Maria’s childhood through her marriage and subsequent escape. We get to know her family, including some scenes featuring Aunt Adele (Antje Traue), and Maria’s father and uncle (Henry Goodman, Allan Corduner). We understand this family’s place in society and just how dramatically they were impacted by the Nazi takeover.

Helen Mirren delivers yet another exceptional performance and manages to pull off the snappy lines without an ounce of schmaltz, while also capturing the emotional turmoil Ms. Altmann endures. Director Curtis and writer Alexi Kaye Campbell round off some of the rough edges and inject enough humor to prevent this from being the gut-wrenching process it probably was in real life. This approach makes the film, the story and the characters more relatable for most movie goers … and it’s quite an enjoyable look at a fascinating woman and a pretty remarkable underdog story.

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SAFE HOUSE

February 12, 2012

 Greetings again from the darkness. The action-thriller-spy genre can be quite fun when handled properly. The “Bourne” franchise and Salt come immediately to mind. What we have here is a ho-hum game of cat and mouse between CIA Agents elevated somewhat because they are played by Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds. It’s ho-hum because of the simplistic and predictable script from writer David Guggenheim.

To offset this formulaic script, director Daniel Espinosa leans heavily on near non-stop, frenzied action sequences. Luckily he has DP Oliver Wood (first two Bourne movies) to bring intensity and variety to the action. Denzel plays the veteran rogue agent who turns himself in to a U.S. Consulate after a decade off the grid. We learn he is a U.S. traitor of the worst degree. Reynolds plays a rookie agent on asignment to a going-nowhere “safe house” in South Africa. To say the action is lacking on his assignment is a bit of an understatement. That is, until Denzel is transferred to his site.

We learn a few things in this movie. First, “Safe house” is evidently CIA verbiage for “all hell breaks loose” in the form of massive gunfire and violent deception. Second, if you are an agent in charge of escorting one of the world’s most dangerous men, you would prefer your bosses not send the two of you into a crowded soccer stadium to pick up a GPS device. Things are likely to go wrong. Third, it’s not wise to walk in on Denzel when he is in a bathroom stall. Fourth, if you are Ryan Reynolds, your on screen girlfriends can be as beautiful as your real life girlfriends, and no one raises an eyebrow.

The film does remind us that it’s always cool to see Sam Shepard and Ruben Blades. Where have you been hiding Mr. Blades (pictured)? The rest of the strong cast includes Brendon Gleeson and Vera Farmiga as dueling Langley operatives, Liam Cunningham as a (surprise!) bad guy, Robert Patrick and Joel Kinnaman (from “The Killing“) as agents, and Nora Arnezeder as Reynolds’ hottie.

Being a fan of this genre, it is quite disappointing to see such an obvious and basic story … even though it has the right look and feel, and a nice match-up of stars. The overload of car crashes, gunfire, and hand to hand combat doesn’t offset the fact that everyone knows early on how this is going to end, and we suffer through quick teases of intrigue regarding the two leads. So even though Denzel makes an enjoyable good guy turned bad, and Reynolds shows he is way above the idiotic Green Lantern, this one just doesn’t offer much more than your average video game.

SEE THIS MOVIE IF: you have a hole that can only be filled with excessive noise, gun fire, car wrecks, blood and frenetic fight scenes.

SKIP THIS MOVIE IF: you are looking for something new in the spy thriller genre

watch the trailer:


GREEN LANTERN

June 18, 2011

 Greetings again from the darkness. I have admitted many times that I am a sucker for Super Hero movies. There is just something really cool about an average guy falling bassackwards into super-human strength and being able to fly. With that said, I readily admit some Super Hero movies are better than others. While this one has some entertaining moments, it certainly isn’t one of the better entries in this genre.

It is difficult to know if a viewer is better off as a Green Lantern expert or novice for this adaptation. I can see both sides. The film beats us over the head with explanations, lectures and details but falls way short of the desired action sequences.

 Basic storyline has test pilot Hal Jordan (Ryan Reynolds) chosen by “the ring” to become part of the Green Lantern Corps … an intergalactic peace-keeping patrol. Yes, he would be the first human Lantern and no, he is not readily accepted by the leader Sinestro (Mark Strong). By the way, who would choose a guy named SINESTRO to be the leader of your army of good guys?

There are roughly a half million sub-stories that get a blip and then are cast aside. That’s the film’s biggest problem, next to the shortage of action sequences.  I was surprised at the lack of imagination shown for Green Lantern‘s constructs.  They were a bit cartoonish and reminded of what we saw in 1988’s Who Framed Roger Rabbit?.  On the positive side, Parallax, the evil mass that threatens earth and Oa, looks like a tentacled tumbleweed with a scary face. 

 Some stellar supporting actors here (in addition to Mark Strong) include Tim Robbins, Peter Sarsgaard, Angela Bassett, Michael Clarke Duncan and Geoffrey Rush. Duncan and Rush are voice only, but definitely have an impact. Blake Lively plays Carol Ferris, the co-pilot and would-be girlfriend of Jordan. She is also involved with her Daddy’s defense contracting firm and just doesn’t work as a high-powered exec.

 The film is directed by Martin Campbell who also gave us the near awesome re-awakening of James Bond in Casino Royale (2006). He seems to have a feel for action, but gets to use very little of that talent in this film. It really seems to me that the writing was too scattered and just generally weak for a movie of this size. I kept thinking we were going to get some real mind games between Sarsgaard’s Elephant Man with psychic abilities and Reynold’s perfect body Lantern. Instead, we get just another tease and a disappointing action sequence to end the film.  I would say Marvel has a pretty clear lead over DC Comics on film … except, of course, for Christopher Nolan‘s Batman series.

SEE THIS MOVIE IF: Green is your favorite color OR you have any doubt that Ryan Reynolds has the physique of a super hero.

SKIP THIS MOVIE IF: you never cared to see what would happen if The Elephant Man turned evil OR the recent exposure of Blake Lively has shown you enough

 


BURIED (2010)

September 25, 2010

 Greetings again from the darkness. My comments about last week’s Devil dwelled on the aspect of claustrophobia in being stranded in a stuck elevator with strangers. Forget all that! In this compelling film, Ryan Reynolds wakes up in an enclosed coffin. With a head injury. Buried. In Iraq. With a cell phone. And a lighter. This takes claustrophobia and anxiety attacks to a whole new level.  If you have read Edgar Allan Poe‘s “The Premature Burial”, you have a sense.

Somehow writer Chris Sparling, director Rodrigo Cortes and Ryan Reynolds all bought off on the idea that the ENTIRE FILM should be shot from WITHIN THE COFFIN. Yes, that’s correct. There are no flashbacks to Paul’s (Ryan Reynolds) home life or the convoy ambush. There are no scenes of the FBI working the phones on his behalf. There are no scenes of the kidnappers in some darkened basement. None of that. Just Reynolds. In his wooden coffin. From all angles. In the past, I labeled Ryan Reynolds as just another plug-in for rom-coms.  While his rom-coms rarely appeal to me, I have come to respect him for stretching himself as an actor in other genres.

Paul Conroy, an American contractor working in Iraq, wakes up in a coffin. His kidnappers have provided a cell phone and inform him that he will be released only if they are paid “5 million money”. Paul spends the rest of the film frantically trying to arrange for the ransom by contacting his family, his employer, the FBI and the State Department. I will say no more other than I found my breathing getting quick and shallow and my palms sweaty just watching the plight of this unfortunate man.

There are no outside scenes, excluding a very short, disturbing video the kidnappers send him through the cell phone. The phone conversations are fascinating. You will voice-recognize the great Stephen Tobolowsky as the personnel director performing some quick legal ass-covering. You might also recognize the voice of Tess Harper as Maryann – presumable the mother of Paul’s wife as he tries to make contact. Neither of these are warm fuzzies, but both add to the heightened stress level and desperation.

This is not really a film we would want to watch a second time, but interestingly enough, I could see it becoming a cult fixture similar to “Rocky Horror”. The audience could show up with their cell phone, a lighter, a flask and a couple of other props that I won’t disclose here. Sometimes the best way to handle fear is to laugh in its face. Oh, and answer your cell when loved one’s call. Lastly … I don’t want to be buried alive.

SEE THIS MOVIE IF: you enjoy anxiety attacks

SKIP THIS MOVIE IF: you freak out in a traffic jam OR expect to see Reynolds’ abs.