LILA & EVE (2015)

July 16, 2015

Lila & Eve Greetings again from the darkness. It’s the era of angry cinematic women, and this time we get Viola Davis and Jennifer Lopez as mothers who go on a rampage of violence to gain vengeance for the murders of their sons. In 1991 Thelma & Louise tried to teach abusive and pig-headed men a lesson, and now Lila & Eve face off against neighborhood gangbangers.

Director Charles Stone III is best known for Drumline (2002) and Mr 3000 (2004) and this high-stress thriller seems a departure for him, though he compensates with a talented cast. In addition to Ms. Davis and Ms. Lopez, we get detectives played by Shea Whigham and Andre Royo, and Michole Briana White as the leader of the support group.

Stories of vigilantism always skirt the line between gritty and far-fetched, and unfortunately this one leans a bit too far the wrong way. Watching these two women so easily track down their targets and then so effortlessly ‘take care of business’ is head-shaking when combined with the tricky plot twist. The side story focusing on the support group was actually the most interesting, as it provides a glimpse of the grieving process and psychological effects experienced by mothers of murdered sons. Even this part flies off the rails towards the end of the movie – though it was with the best intentions.

Jennifer Lopez at least seems to take some delight in her character … a role much less restrictive than that of Viola Davis, who is forced to play it straight and angry (and she is very adept at this). Mothers seeking vengeance is a cause I can support, but not more can be said about this film as the first rule of Fight Club …

watch the trailer:

 

 

 


HOME (animated, 2015)

March 26, 2015

home Greetings again from the darkness. Depending upon your expectations for animated films, you will either find this latest from DreamWorks to be nice entertainment for kids, or a bit too simplistic for adults. Twenty years ago Pixar ushered in a golden age of animation with the first Toy Story, and the grading curve was forever changed. If you can accept that not every animated film need be an instant classic, the odds are good that kids will find this to be a very enjoyable hour and a half.

Oh (yes, that’s his name) is the friendliest and most energetic of all the Boovs, a society of technologically advanced aliens who change color based on emotions (similar to a mood ring). The Boovs also excel at running from adversity – especially when their enemy Gorg is chasing. When Captain Smek decides his Boovs will take over earth, he orders the banishment of all humans to Australia (kind of funny when you think about the history of that continent). Left behind is one youngster named Tip (short for Gratuity Tucci, one of the oddest ever screen names for a kid) and her pet, Pig the Cat. It turns out both Oh and Tip are misfits in their own world, and are forced to team up so that Oh can redeem himself and Tip can be reunited with her mother.

The main (and obvious) themes are: stay true to yourself, accept others for what they are (even if they are different from you), and family is important and worth fighting for. Tip is kind of a confusing character because she knows how to drive a car, but admits to being a 7th grader originally from Barbados. Oh has no Boov friends because he is so darned personable and he is always making mistakes – usually due to his desire to connect with others. Captain Smek’s false confidence catapults him into a leadership position, based mostly on his ability to retreat from the difficult decisions. Even the villain Gorg (who looks/dresses like Shredder from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) is simply misunderstood.

As you would expect, there is humor throughout … most of it at a level that those under age 11 will appreciate (that’s not a bad thing). These laughs come courtesy of bubble wrap, a cookbook, awkward dancing, and a hover car that runs on fast food staples like Nacho Mama, Busta Lime frozen drinks, and Burrito Torpedoes. There is a recurring gag showing clumps of earthly items deemed unnecessary by the Boovs, and this gives adults in the audience something to track.

Crucial to the film’s success is the voice acting. Oh is voiced by Jim Parsons as an E.T. version of Sheldon Cooper from “The Big Bang Theory”. His twisted version of the English language (“sad-mad”) is good for a few chuckles, but mostly his eagerness and openness make Oh a character kids will care about. Rihanna voices Tip, and has at least 3 songs on the soundtrack. She does well in capturing the strength and vulnerability of this character who is on a mission to find her mother. Also fun is hearing Matt Jones as Kyle, the ‘is he or is he not’ friend of Oh. Fans of “Breaking Bad” will recognize Mr. Jones as Badger from that series. Not quite as effective are Jennifer Lopez as Tip’s mother and Steve Martin as Captain Smek. Mr. Martin especially could have brought more spark and color to his role.

Director Tim Johnson (Over the Hedge, Antz) took the source material from Adam Rex’s book “The True Meaning of Smekday” and delivered an animated film with a refreshing approach – it doesn’t feature violence, inappropriate humor or a smart-ass kid that disrespects adults. It’s a shame that the unique color palette is quashed by the 3-D technology … and what’s up with the awful title? … but overall, this is one the kids can enjoy (especially if they are struggling to fit in).

watch the trailer:

 

 


PARKER (2013)

January 27, 2013

parker2 Greetings again from the darkness. By now, we know what to expect from a Jason Statham movie: bone-crunching fist fights, big guns, fast cars, pretty girls, and wise cracks. Hope and expectations were a bit higher for this one since it’s a John J. McLaughlin (Black Swan) screenplay of a Donald E Westlake novel, and it’s directed by Taylor Hackford (Oscar nominated for Ray).

Statham plays Parker, a masterful thief with a straightforward code that he isn’t shy about sharing. His partner/mentor is played by Nick Nolte and Parker finds himself knocking off the Ohio State Fair with a group of guys led by Michael Chiklis. Things don’t go well and Parker finds himself left for dead.

It starts as a heist film and transitions into a revenge flick. Of course, there are some Statham style romantic elements included. Emma Booth plays Nolte’s daughter and Statham’s love interest. Then, we get Jennifer Lopez as a down on her luck Realtor who lives with her mom (Patti Lupone), but somehow manages to figure out that Statham’s character is not as he appears.

parker3 Lopez and her hyper over-acting don’t play well with the stoic Statham. She does, however, get to flash her best known ASSet. Nolte’s character gets lost in the shuffle, which is a shame. More scenes with Nolte and Statham could have proved interesting. Also, there is an odd story line with Bobby Cannavale as a Sheriff who has the hots for Lopez. With the exception of a brief interlude, this promising story line just disappears. Lastly, the film’s big Palm Beach heist really pushes the envelope of believability (scuba?  Chiklis isn’t exactly James Bond) and taints what sliver of reasonableness that might have existed.

Basically, Statham is the best thing about this Statham movie. The rest is pretty messy and disappointing … especially considering the DNA that this one offers (Hackford, McLaughlin, Nolte).

SEE THIS MOVIE IF: you are a big Jason Statham fan

SKIP THIS MOVIE IF: you prefer your heist and/or revenge movies to have some level of suspense

watch the trailer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJ4Nsu2tXTk