DARK CRIMES (2018)

May 30, 2018

 Greetings again from the darkness. A neo-noir “inspired by actual events” and based on a compelling 2008 “New Yorker” article by the great David Grann (THE LOST CITY OF Z) seems to have the necessary components for a satisfying thriller. So what went wrong? Unfortunately, a messy script from Jeremy Brock (THE LAST KING OF SCOTLAND) prevents this one from ever having a chance at grabbing our attention, much less holding it.

This is the first English language film from director Alexandros Avranas (MISS VIOLENCE, 2013) and his cast is led by Jim Carrey as police inspector Tadek, a disgraced cop who takes care of his elderly mother while also obsessing over the now coldcase that ruined his career. Carrey sports a Polish accent through “most” of his performance … a performance that is mostly subdued, especially given his career. Joining him as co-leads in the cast are two other excellent actors: Martin Csokas and Charlotte Gainsbourg. Csokas plays Kozlow, the main antagonist and suspect – an author with clues to the key murder highlighted in his novel. Ms. Gainsbourg is underutilized as Kasia, the former sex worker, now intimate acquaintance of Kozlow. She is the key to solving the case.

Grann’s article entitled “True Crimes: A Postmodern Murder Mystery” told the story of novelist/convicted murderer Krystian Bala. It’s an article worth reading and one that bears only passing resemblance to this screen adaptation. The film is purposefully drab, bleak, dark, grey and dour, with a stark, cold look to the characters and most every scene. Tadek is a man on a mission to save his reputation, even at the expense of his family life, or really any life at all. The game of cat and mouse between Tadek and Kozlow never reaches the level of tension that the film seems to think it does … even in the one-on-one interrogation scene or the seemingly endless blabbering of the recordings Tadek listens to.

There is a terrific international cast of supporting actors including iVlad Ivanov, Robert Wieckiewicz, Piotr Glowacki and Agata Kulesza, but the cast is only able to do so much with the material. Perhaps the draw is supposed to be Jim Carrey is the darkest role of his career. On the bright side, the story is neatly wrapped up at the end thanks to one character who deserves a “win”.

watch the trailer:

 

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THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE (2013)

March 18, 2013

Incredible Burt2 Greetings again from the darkness. As I sat in a theatre with approximately 80 others, it took me awhile to realize that the only audible laughs were coming from a couple of teenagers near the back. Until that point, I had just assumed that my grumpy old man syndrome had reared its head as I managed only a couple of chuckles.

The best comparison I have for this “comedy” from director Don Scardino (“30 Rock”) are the Will Ferrell sports-themed spoofs Blades of Glory and Semi-Pro. If you found those to be hilarious, then this one might provide you some laughs. Rather than picking on a sport, the movie focuses on the world of Las Vegas magic shows … big-budget stage productions (David Copperfield, Siegfried & Roy) vs. streetwise illusionists (Criss Angel, David Blaine).

incredible burt4Childhood friends Albert and Anton evolve into Vegas superstars Burt Wonderstone (Steve Carell) and Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi). The influence of Siegfried and Roy are obvious, right down to the costumes, hair and tans. After 10 years of the exact same act, Wonderstone is a pompous womanizer who cares little for the magic act, and Anton is the epitome of the invisible sideman. Casino owner Doug Munny (James Gandolfini) threatens to end the act if the duo doesn’t come up with something new to compete against the daring and popular street illusionist Steve Gray (Jim Carrey).

Gray’s “Brain-rape” act is supposed to compare to Criss Angel’s “Mind-freak”. Instead, Gray comes across more like cheap reality TV with masochistic tendencies. Of course, Burt and Anton collapse under the pressure and their friendship and act splatters to a painful end. Burt spirals out of control and ends up performing in a nursing home … a fortuitous turn that introduces him to his childhood idol (Alan Arkin).

incredible burt3 All you really need to know is that this comedy offers few laughs and only shows a pulse when Arkin and Carrey are on screen. Carell seems miscast as a pompous womanizer, so neither trait plays particularly well. Additionally, his bounce back is not believable since his rock bottom lasts about 30 seconds. Buscemi’s only real gag is his poke at celebrity humanitarian crusades. Otherwise, he and Olivia Wilde are bystanders with little to do, which is a shame. Really would have liked to see Carrey’s character with a better, more believable act so that the rivalry might have proved more interesting.

There is an underlying message of friendship and maintaining a passion, but this is no message movie. Heck, it’s barely even a comedy … unless you are one of those teenagers in the back row.

SEE THIS MOVIE IF: you long for a glimpse of the past from Jim Carrey or the scene-stealing wonder known as Alan Arkin

SKIP THIS MOVIE IF: you are seeking an insightful, funny comedy that takes advantage of a strong cast

watch the trailer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kn1wR1V9dqs


I LOVE YOU PHILLIP MORRIS (2009)

December 11, 2010

 Greetings again from the darkness. The real story of Steven Russell is downright fascinating. He is the ultimate con man and has been nicknamed “King Con”. A master of reading people, gaining trust and manipulating many systems, Russell was proved to have stolen from a major food service corporation and a major healthcare organization. Stolen, as in hundreds of thousands of dollars. The smaller cons are too numerous to count. And don’t forget his string of jail/prison escapes!

Glenn Ficarra and John Regua (the writing team behind Bad Santa) co-direct this story based on Steve McVicer’s book on Russell. Somehow they have delivered a hokey, boring film despite the man at the center of the story. Luckily for them, Jim Carrey drums up a terrific performance as Russell and provides some relief from the amateurish script and direction.

The role of Phillip Morris is tackled by Ewan McGregor in a manner we have not previously seen from him. His effeminate naivety offers a nice contrast to the domineering Russell/Carrey. The support work is minimal but provided by the very capable Rodrigo Santoro and the very talented (but totally wasted here) Leslie Mann.

The film shows us the beginning of the fall for Russell. His parents tell him he was adopted and he responds by tracking down his birth mother. He pretty much falls apart after that meeting and commences with his endless stream of cons. Is he a happily married man or is he gay? Is he a brilliant strategist or an embezzler? His life changes during one of his trips to jail. He meets Phillip Morris. Their life together is full of excess, thanks to Russell’s latest scam. As always, the con is exposed and Russell spends his entire life alternating between being on the lam or in jail.

I found the film inferior to Catch Me if You Can, a better (not great) film about another real life con man, Frank Abignale. The cat and mouse chases of that film held my interest. This film has little drama despite the obvious talents of this off-center man. My guess is that in the hands of better filmmakers, this could have been a much improved film.

Apparently, Russell’s biggest con was played on himself. He never really figured out who he is. He is now serving a life sentence in near-solitary confinement in prison. Mr. McVicker, the book’s author, has stated two very telling observations. First, he suspects Phillip Morris was not quite as innocent as he would have us believe. Second, his description of Russell as a man “who makes you want to believe” tells you all you need know about this ultimate con man.

SEE THIS MOVIE IF: You still need proof that Jim Carrey is a real actor and not just a goofy side show OR the Enron scandal just wasn’t quite funny enough for you

SKIP THIS MOVIE IF: You have read the book OR don’t find much humor in con men