DATING & NEW YORK (2021)

September 9, 2021

Greetings again from the darkness. One must presume that many Millennials in their mid-to-late 20s will recognize and relate to the characters and situations in this indie Romantic Comedy from writer-director Jonah Feingold. For those born prior to 1980, that’s likely to be more challenging, and in fact, some of the conversations may more closely resemble a foreign language than familiar human exchanges. We can almost picture the emoji’s as these characters speak.

Milo (Jaboukie Young-White) and Wendy (Francesca Reale) are two single New Yorkers who match on the cleverly-named dating app, “Meet Cute”. Of course, that’s also the cinematic description for most every Rom-Com initial introduction since the days of Howard Hawks, Frank Capra, and Ernst Lubitsch. After a perfect first date-turned one-night stand, Milo and Wendy ghost each other. Three weeks later they have a café meeting where Wendy presents a “Best Friends with Benefits” contract. He wants more, while she just wants this. BFWB is a step beyond FWB since it’s more than sex. The two will regularly hang out and offer each other life and relationship advice – but definitely no “I love you” or PDA. Even their friends Hank (Brian Muller) and Jessie (Catherine Cohen) recognize this for the bad idea it is … but Hank and Jessie are too distracted developing their own bond to care too much.

Feingold utilizes some very cool water colors over the opening credits, and Grant Fonda’s score is spot on throughout. There will be comparisons to FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS and NO STRONGS ATTACHED, two movies released in 2011. However, a better and more interesting connection is to see how Feingold was influenced by WHEN HARRY MET SALLY… (1989) and ANNIE HALL (1977), two of the very best romantic comedies. Just keep in mind that this film is for those born in this modern era, where the rules of dating are determined by social media and dating (hook-up) apps. We are told that Millennials are “cursed with choices”.

Feingold’s characters discover break-up email templates (these people can’t subject themselves to face-to-face conflict), the real world expense of wedding planners, the confusing dynamics of haggling over who pays for dinner and drinks, and of course, the importance of guacamole. The characters are believable and seem like folks we could know … except when they speak. Jerry Ferrara (Turtle in “Entourage”) plays doorman Cole and also serves as the film’s narrator, a welcome guide through the reasons behind the actions.

Cinematographer Maria Rusche effectively captures the familiar sites of NYC, as well as the food and drink moments that go with dating. Director Feingold comes up short in his cameo, although in a humorous way. The four lead actors are not yet household names, and probably won’t be recognized by most viewers – though expect them to be part of the next wave. Mostly Feingold keeps things light and cutesy, and whether intentionally or not, reminds us that social media can be manipulative and controlling. Those pushing 30, especially New Yorkers, will likely enjoy seeing their life on screen, while the rest of us simply wonder how hooking up and hanging out isn’t considered a serious relationship.

In select theaters and available on digital beginning September 10, 2021

WATCH THE TRAILER


LAST VEGAS (2013)

November 9, 2013

last vegas1 Greetings again from the darkness. I’ve been writing about “Gray Cinema” for the past few years and the understandable desire of Hollywood to capitalize on the aging population. Take that trend and mix it with new-age buddy pictures like The Hangover and Bridesmaids, and you can at least imagine what director Jon Turteltaub (the National Treasure movies) and writer Dan Fogelman (the very entertaining Crazy Stupid Love) were attempting to create.

The film’s poster recalls the glory days of the Rat Pack, so taking this foursome of sixty-something year old childhood buddies to Las Vegas presents many possibilities. There is no shortage of enthusiasm from the four leads: Michael Douglas as Billy, the smooth-talking lifelong bachelor who proposed to his thirty-ish girlfriend at a funeral; Morgan Freeman as Archie, suffocating in a cocoon of family over-protection; Robert Deniro as Paddy, the isolated widow wallowing in grief for the past year; and Kevin Kline as Sam, the stir-crazy Florida stereotype bored with 4:00 dinner parties and his marriage.

last vegas2 These top notch actors give it all they have, but there is just no rescuing such fluff and lack of substance. The script is frustrating throughout and just gives no credit to an audience that might appreciate even a gag or story line that wasn’t obvious from the opening credits. Mary Steenburgen‘s character provides a brief respite, but the developments are so absurd that neither her character or the story line can be taken seriously.

Toss in a bar fight, bikini contest, mandatory viagra jokes, a world class Casino penthouse, an inconceivable party that would be shut down by fire code, and a wasted cameo from 50 Cent … and you get a lame, flat, mostly unfunny story that barely skims the surface of an endless stream of possibly interesting topics.  It’s certainly not at the level of The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel … or even Space Cowboys.

I’ll end by stating that I am a huge fan of Gray Cinema, but my request is that some effort go into the script and production so that viewers are provided with an entertaining and intelligent and respectful experience. There is no need to dwell on the bits of culture that have passed them by or the physical ailments that plague their activities. Luckily, the stellar cast prevents this one from flopping to the level that the script deserves.

SEE THIS MOVIE IF: you can appreciate the novelty of a cast of leading men all in their sixties and seventies OR you get a kick out of knowing the punchline of every joke before it actually happens

SKIP THIS MOVIE IF: you expect a certain level of “smarts” in movies … even comedies.

watch the trailer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMnr-R7BkkU