UNDERWATER (2020)

January 10, 2020

 Greetings again from the darkness. The opening credits have an “X-Files” look and feel. Newspaper headlines and redacted reports zip by … in fact, the rapid cuts are so quick that very few viewers will be able to keep up. Even if you haven’t finished your Evelyn Woods speed-reading course, the gist is clear: there is a (very) deep-water drilling lab located 36,000 feet below the ocean’s surface. Yep, that’s almost 7 miles deep for the crew of 316, and some mysterious bad things may or may not be lurking. That’s really our only set-up … unless you want to count Kristen Stewart brushing her teeth.

It’s literally less than 5 minutes in when the rig is rocked by an explosion of some kind. We are told the structure is 70% damaged. The survivors are quickly identified. Nora (Ms. Stewart) and Rodrigo (Mamoudou Athie) are together in the immediate aftermath. Nora is a mechanical engineer and computer whiz. They soon come across a co-worker buried in rubble. It’s wise-cracking TJ Miller and his (actual) stuffed bunny. Next up are the Captain (Vincent Cassel) and lovebirds Emily (Jessica Henwick) and Smith (John Gallagher Jr). With no time for early character development, we learn tidbits as their perilous journey hopefully leads them towards rescue. Of course anyone who has ever watched a movie can tell you, they won’t all make it. Maybe the 8 year old girl sitting in the row behind me wouldn’t know that … but no parent should take their 8 year old to a PG-13 movie that has “terror” in the parental warnings.

Director William Eubank and co-writers Brian Duffield and Adam Cozad create plenty of tension, danger and suspense. The movie is at its best when they let the moment speak. It’s the dialogue that is mostly cringe-worthy, as well as the predictable and unnecessary jump-scares. These people are stranded miles deep in the ocean and are running out of oxygen and options … and are being chased by something they can’t identify. The visual effects are successful in generating the environment of danger and claustrophobia.

It’s in the little things where the film falters. When we first see the Captain, he has his arm in a sling. He’s obviously injured. Once the bulky underwater suits are donned, his bad arm seems just fine … he’s even pulling one of the others with a rope! Nora makes a big deal about being the “smallest” of the group and volunteers to explore a narrow passage. The problem is that they are all wearing the same suits – a fact that should negate any advantage of Ms., Stewart’s slim, toned body. Lastly, the film has borrowed heavily from James Cameron’s classic ALIEN. In fact, it has been referred to as “Underwater Alien”. Of course, this film isn’t nearly as well-rounded or complete as that one … but then few are.

Mr. Eubank’s film is a sci-fi/horror mash-up, but it’s really more a survival thriller than science fiction or creature feature, although the sea creatures have their moments. Cinematographer Bojan Bazelli does a nice job in keeping with the ‘play it straight’ approach, and his camera work is complemented by the electronic score from Marco Beltrami and Brandon Roberts. Ms. Stewart and her buzzed blond hair hold their own amidst the danger. A blatant lecture about how we are going places (deep sea) we shouldn’t go and doing things (drilling) we shouldn’t do is included for those who might not figure it out on their own, but mostly we spend our time trying to figure out how to survive the deep sea pressure with little oxygen and no escape pods. Just leave the 8-year olds at home.

watch the trailer:


JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT (2013)

January 18, 2014

jack ryan Greetings again from the darkness. Tom Clancy’s spy novels have produced four prior movies with three different actors appearing as Jack Ryan: Alec Baldwin in The Hunt for Red October, Harrison Ford in Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger, and Ben Affleck in The Sum of All Fears. While not based on a specific Clancy novel, this latest is a prequel clearly attempting to re-boot the franchise with Chris Pine as Ryan.

Screenwriters Adam Cozad and David Koepp have come up with an elaborate backstory beginning with Ryan (Chris Pine) as a university student so impacted by the 9/11 events that he enlists in the Marines. His heroic actions in Afghanistan and impressive recovery from serious injuries draw the attention of Kevin Costner’s character who recruits Ryan into the CIA. Ryan is established as a genius analyst quickly rising through the ranks at his Wall Street firm.

That entire set up is well played and quite interesting. A character who is believable as both a Marine-trained combat expert and a world-class financial analyst is borderline superhero stuff, so a fine line must be walked. Oddly enough, the big mission that Ryan falls into is actually reminiscent of the Cold War James Bond films. Foiling a terrorist act and a Russian plot to crash the US economy may be a bit far-fetched, but not if you have Chris Pine and Kevin Costner on your side! The best scene … and most worthy of an espionage thriller … takes place at a fancy Russian restaurant. Dining together are Ryan, his fiancé (Keira Knightley) and the Russian bad guy (played by the film’s director Kenneth Branagh). It reminds somewhat of the poker game between Bond and Le Chiffre in Casino Royale. Every glance and every word have dual meanings, and they all know they are being played. Unfortunately, it’s this terrific little dinner that begins the downward spiral for the movie. The action sequences are just plain silly, and the car chases, tricked out surveillance vans, and all-knowing super computer programs are just too familiar and tiresome to be effective.

Kenneth Branagh has had an extremely diverse directing career with films such as Frankenstein (1994), Hamlet (1996) and Thor (2011). It’s understandable that he would jump at the chance to re-ignite this franchise, but the genre is filled with high level competition – especially Bond and Bourne. So while it’s entertaining enough for a January action movie, it’s not at the level of the other franchises.

Perhaps Chris Pine is a bit too ambitious. Already established as the new Captain Kirk in the Star Trek re-boot, he seems somewhat over-matched in the Jack Ryan role. His stunning blue eyes may rival those of Frank Sinatra, but his screen presence falls short of Harrison Ford.

Three favorite pieces in this one are recognition for Manhattan’s long time theatre Film Forum, a two scene cameo from ballet great Mikhail Baryshnikov, and the appearance of Peter Andersson as Branagh’s head of security (he was the sleazebag case worker in Sweden’s original The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). Kevin Costner states this is geopolitics, but I believe it is closer to Hollywood’s desperation to recapture success instead of creating something new.

SEE THIS MOVIE IF: it’s January and your button for an Action flick is being pushed after all the Oscar releases in December.

SKIP THIS MOVIE IF: you now expect all action/thriller movies to be at the level of Bond and Bourne.

watch the trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9KAnx4EvaE