BATTLE OF THE SEXES (2017)

September 29, 2017

 Greetings again from the darkness. At least two generations are too young to have experienced the 1973 media circus that was the tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs. However, what matters is that the impact and social changes that began in earnest that night at the Astrodome are still being felt and evolving today. It might seem incredulous that the 29 year old top-ranked women’s player emerging victorious against a 55 year old who played his last professional match 14 years prior would have an impact on anything other than TV rankings, but in fact, it caused a significant societal shift.

Real life married couple and co-directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris are well known for their collaborations on iconic music videos and TV commercials, and since joining the movie world have brought us LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE and RUBY SPARKS. Their talent for visual presentation is on display here in both the tennis scenes and the more intimate character moments. And, oh my, there are some intimate moments thanks to the script from Oscar winning screenwriter Simon Beaufoy (SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE). There is no shying away from Ms. King’s sexual confusion/awareness/preferences.

Emma Stone (Oscar winner for LA LA LAND) stars as tennis legend Billie Jean King and manages to convey three different sides: the ultra-competitor, the champion for equal rights, and the married woman coming to grips with her sexual identity. Steve Carell captures the essence and mannerisms of Bobby Riggs, the former tennis champ, floundering in middle-age and always on the lookout for his next hustle or gambling opportunity. Surprisingly, only a minor portion of the film deals with the actual tennis match. Instead, the film dives into the personal lives of these two polar opposite personalities, each with their own challenges and issues.

Despite the fun and outrageousness that the Riggs character delivers, the film might have been better served focusing even more on Ms. King. While she needed the “villain”, it was really her dedication to the cause and strength amidst the backlash that made the difference … along with her court skills. Watching her stand tall in confrontations with the chauvinistic and powerful Jack Kramer (Bill Pullman) is something to behold. Again, those that weren’t around might not believe some of the outrageous claims by the men of the times.

Supporting work comes from Andrea Riseborough as the all-important Marilyn, who turns Billie Jean away from her husband Larry (Austin Stowell), Sarah Silverman as promoter Gladys Heldman, Natalie Morales as Rosie Casales, Alan Cumming as the colorful clothes designer, an underutilized Elisabeth Shue as Riggs’ wife, Fred Armisen as Rheo Blair – Riggs’ partner in the herbs and vitamins game, and Lewis Pullman (Bill’s real life son) as Riggs’ son, Larry. We are even treated to a Bob Stephenson sighting as the Sugar Daddy PR guy at the match.

This was the era when the Vietnam War was winding down, the Watergate scandal was raging, outside “the norm” sexual preferences were kept in the closet, prize money for men’s tennis was 8-10 times that of women, and the overall respect for women and their sports was excruciatingly misguided. Listening to Howard Cosell speak so condescendingly during the national broadcast merely confirms the inequity. Of course, these same issues are discussed and debated even today, as society evolution is often slow, even when moving in the right direction. The film might not add much to today’s cause, but it reinforces the early legacy of Billie Jean King as a difference-maker.

watch the trailer:

Advertisements

BURLESQUE (2010)

November 18, 2010

 Greetings again from the darkness.  Attended a Tuesday screening and must admit that I was blown away by Christina Aguilera.  The film is first and foremost a showcase of her musical talent … and quite a talent she is!  Of course, you better be ready for the humor and visuals aimed at the audience attracted to an event featuring Cher and Christina.

Ali (Aguilera) is a bored, small town Iowa girl who heads off to find the bright lights of L.A.  She stumbles into a Burlesque club and is immediately enchanted by the songs, the dancers and the ambience.  The club is co-owned by Tess (Cher) and her ex-husband Vince (Peter Gallagher) and is on a steep slide towards financial disaster.  Local real estate developer Marcus (Eric Dane) rides in on his classic Porsche and fat wallet and offers to rescue Tess and Vince.  Of course, his plan for the club is anything but altruistic.

 Meanwhile, Marcus and Jack the bartender (Cam Gigandet) battle over Ali, though neither are very good at it.  While that battle is going on, Ali manages to leapfrog a burned out Nikki (Kristin Bell) for the spotlight on stage.  This is when the movie really takes off, musically speaking.

From a musical perspective, Cher belts out a couple of solos that easily convince that her pipes are still full strength.  Her two songs are definite highlights and it’s a pleasure to hear her in top form – at age 64!  Aguilera has so many numbers that I lost track.  Most are average songs at best, but her voice is so unique and powerful that the non-descript songs come off just fine.

 Must also mention Alan Cumming and especially Stanley Tucci.  Mr. Tucci is clearly the best actor in the movie, though he basically reprises a previous character (Devil Wears Prada).  Oh and there is the bonus of a very odd Tucci bedroom scene. 

There will be comparisons to Dreamgirls, Cabaret, Chicago and Moulin Rouge!  This is no litmus test for Ms. Aguilera’s acting ability, though she comes off infinitely better than Mariah Carey in the atrocious Glitter.  Writer and first time director Steve Antin pretty much stays out of the way of Cher and Christina, while delivering the expected and welcome product to his intended audience … not that there’s anything wrong with it.

SEE THIS MOVIE IF: you need an intro to Christina Aguilera’s singing ability OR you are a fan of Cher (like anything could keep you away!)

SKIP THIS MOVIE IF: bump and grind dancing is not your cup of tea OR you can’t appreciate campy humor filmed for the enjoyment of the gay community

See the Burlesque trailer