SING STREET (2016)


DALLAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2016

sing street Greetings again from the darkness. The vast majority of 1980’s music usually inspires nothing but groans and an immediate change of the radio channel from me. Yet writer/director John Carney masterfully captured and held my attention with this crowd-pleasing story that leans heavily on the tunes from that era.

Mr. Carney was also responsible for two previous music-centric movies, Once (2007) and Begin Again (2013). He is an exceptional story teller who puts music at the center, but avoids the label of “musical” by making it about people, rather than notes.

It’s 1985 in economically depressed Dublin, and a strong opening sequence introduces us to Connor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) as his ever-arguing parents (Aidan Gillen, Maria Doyle Kennedy) inform him of the economic necessity of pulling him out of prep school and enrolling him into a much tougher environment … one that comes with bullies and hard-nosed teachers/clergy.

Soon enough Connor is hanging with the misfits and inviting an enchanting “older” girl to star in his band’s video. She agrees, and wide-eyed Connor quickly sets out to form a band that didn’t previously exist.

There are two interesting and fully realized relationships that make this movie click: Connor and the enchanting Raphina (Lucy Boynton), and Connor and his older brother Brendon (Jack Reynor). Brendan is Connor’s life mentor and music guru. They are quick to jump on the new world of music videos, and it’s a real hoot to watch Connor emulate the style and fashion of Duran, Duran, The Cure, etc.

It’s fascinating to note that Connor, while a pretty talented lyricist and singer, doesn’t really seem to be in love with the music except as a means to an end … a way to get the girl. That said, the real message here is that while teenagers often feel like they can’t fix the outside world (parents, teachers, bullies), they can fix themselves by finding a passion in life (the movie uses the term vocation).

It’s hard not to notice the influence of such filmmakers as John Hughes and Cameron Crowe, and Carney certainly brings his touch of romanticism. Plus, one must appreciate any movie that delivers an original song as catchy as “Drive it like you Stole it”, while also taking a shot at Phil Collins. It’s a funny and sweet movie that should really catch on through positive word of mouth.

watch the trailer:

 

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