ROOM (2015)


room Greetings again from the darkness. Tragically, stories of women being held captive have become all too common in this sometimes frightening world in which we live. Emma Donoghue had the high profile, real life situations of Jaycee Dugard, Elisabeth Fritzl and Amanda Berry (Ariel Castro) to draw from for her terrific novel upon which this film is based. While not easy for anyone (especially parents) to watch, it’s a well made movie with outstanding performances … including a career-changer from Brie Larson.

Director Lenny Abrahamson (Frank, a critical favorite from last year) takes us inside the world – or more accurately – the walls where Ma (Brie Larson) and her just turning 5 year old son Jack (Jacob Tremblay) live. Seven years ago, Larson’s character was abducted while walking home from school, and since then she has given birth to Jack, and the two have been held captive in a small shed with only a skylight connecting to the outer spaces of life. The captor … known as Old Nick (Sean Bridgers) … periodically brings them supplies, while also regularly visiting to satisfy his more base needs with Ma.

For the first half of the film, we as viewers are held prisoners right along with Ma and Jack. We see what a patient and wonderful mother she is as she strives to provide some semblance of hope for her son, though in a nearly hopeless situation. When Jack turns 5, Ma begins to explain the outside world to him, as she knows they must try to escape in order for her son to have any semblance of a normal life. During this time, we are in awe of this 10 x 10 environment and how it is every bit the nightmare we have imagined while reading the articles and seeing the reports on real life ordeals.

The second half of the film is equally fascinating, as we watch young Jack and his sense of wonder and caution at discovering the real world. We also see the psychological trauma that Ma experiences after staying strong for so long. Assimilating into society brings different challenges for both Ma and Jack, plus those of her mother (Joan Allen), her father (William H Macy) and her mom’s new beau (Tom McCamus). The film doesn’t shy away from their reactions, though some are easier to stomach than others.

Providing any more details would soften the impact of the film, and this is one that is meant to be felt – even if it’s a true kick in the gut. The film is well cast and well acted, and young Jacob Tremblay captures our hearts quickly and joins the short list of child actors who go far beyond “cute” and into profound. Brie Larson exploded onto the acting scene in Short Term 12, one of my favorite movies of 2013; but it’s here where she steps into the elite level of actresses. She brings a tenacity and emotional strength that leaves us never doubting whether she has “her strong”.

watch the trailer:

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: